The Stages of Dementia


December 08, 2016 in: The Stages of Dementia,

The seven stages of dementia are broken up to give caregivers and medical professionals a timeline to follow with progress measurements to follow to track a patient’s cognitive deterioration and then figure out treatment that meets their needs based on where they are at currently.

STAGE 1: NO COGNITIVE REDUCTION

This means there are zero signs of dementia, loss of memory and no behavioral issues.

STAGE 2: VERY LOW KEY REDUCTION IN COGNITION

As people age they start forgetting things like people’s names and things like checkbook or keys. Medical professionals or caregivers may not see anything, but this is the start of mild impairment, but it may not to be dementia.

STAGE 3: SLIGHT REDUCTION IN COGNITION

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is when a person is suffering from ongoing issues with cognition and memory.  The important thing is to recognize it now so that it reduces patient stress and to move forward with medical care to treat the dementia early.

STAGE 4: MODERATE COGNITIVE DECLINE

A patient at this stage will start to obvious signs of reduction in mental capabilities that signal the beginning of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. Caregivers need to pay attention to signals such as struggles with basic day to day task, lowered ability to think abstract thoughts, reduction of responsiveness, and struggles with anger and socialization.

STAGE 5: MODERATELY SEVERE COGNITIVE DECLINE

Starting at stage 5, and going forward with dementia a later stages, a person will stop being able to bath themselves, dress or function in the home. This is also known a mid-stage dementia.

STAGE 6: SEVERE COGNITIVE DECLINE

Middle dementia, which is stage 6, is dementia stage where caregivers has to give assistance doing all basic daily tasks including using the toilet, eating, dressing and day to day care. Other symptoms include problems with sleep, personality issues like delusions, anxiety, major memory loss

STAGE 7: VERY SEVERE COGNITIVE DECLINE

Late-stage dementia, which is severe Alzheimer’s, a person can no longer do any ordinary self-care, feed themselves, or use the bathroom on their own. They struggle with motor skills and they may not be able talk, get up and walk or even smile without assistance.

At Phoenix, AZ, assisted living facility The Palazzo we know it is important for caregivers to know the seven stages of dementia so you can make arrangements to provide the right level of care your loved one needs at each stage. 

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